Monthly Archives: September 2012

Wolf Reintroduction in Mexico: Why it can Benefit the Ecosystem

For many people, it may seem counterintuitive to think that carnivores play an integral role in maintaining healthy ecosystems because carnivores are dependent on the death of other animals to remain alive. In actuality, the reason why carnivores are so … Continue reading

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Mother nature vs. the Southern Pied Babbler: the battle heats up

Author, Katherine du Plessis, with Southern Pied Babbler The trend of global warming could prove catastrophic for warm-blooded species due to the tradeoffs between keeping cool and other necessary activities for survival such as finding food. In arid environments, where … Continue reading

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Falling flat: Local bird populations face a growing threat of decline in conjunction with wind turbine expansion

Wind turbines have long been the poster-child for successful sustainable energy projects, but like the energy sources they seek to replace, they too exert an unwanted negative impact on the environment. In recent years, collisions with turbines in newly formed … Continue reading

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Corruption and financial fraud of reforestation fund amounts to 5.2 billion in losses; Casts doubt on REDD+ efficacy

Conservation biologists have looked to REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) as a potential realistic alternative to increasing biodiversity in threatened areas. The objective is to reduce greenhouse gases by providing financial incentives to encourage companies to abstain … Continue reading

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Cold-Water Corals and Their Newfound Importance

  For most people, the first thing that comes to mind when someone utters the word ‘coral’ are the expansive, highly diverse (and very publicized) tropical coral reefs known for their brightly-colored façades and equally vibrant inhabitants. While these particular … Continue reading

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Forest Fauna and Vertebrates in Indian Himalayas Threatened by Hydropower Project

  Humans have been building dams as irrigation systems for centuries. In 1950, there were a total of 5,000 dams worldwide, in 2000 this number increased to over 45,000 dams. This exponential increase has affects countless numbers of ecosystems. The … Continue reading

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Is the Clearing of Alien/Invasive Species in South Africa Cost-Effective?

An alien invasion?! Of course not. Just an alien/invasive species, the Acacia mearnsii.            Alien species, also known as invasive species, are species that are not native to a particular region. Alien species can cause problems in the region’s ecosystem … Continue reading

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