Category Archives: Conservation Editorials 2015

Playing with Nature

Humans have spent most of our time on Earth bending and twisting nature to fit our needs and wants. About 12000 year ago, we figured out that if we purposefully grow a few plants in large amounts, then we could … Continue reading

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Juvenile Turtles More Destructive than Media Portrayals Suggest

Let us imagine a young child who has grown bored of his pet turtles. The parents decide that the right thing to do is to release the turtles into the wild. In the child’s mind, the turtles go on to … Continue reading

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Survey Shows that Bats Prefer Coffee over Tea

Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight patrols an inhospitable city and faces a daily struggle of survival just like the bats of the Western Ghats of India. These bats are also fighting for their lives against their loss of habitat to tea … Continue reading

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A Lack of Foresight: One of Conversation Biology’s Most Detrimental Shortcomings

Protecting endangered species is a tough job, and Gary Langham, the Chief Scientist of the National Audubon Society, believes that future climate change will it even tougher. In Science Friday’s Can Conservation Efforts Save the Birds? podcast, Langham said that “climate … Continue reading

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The “Caped Crusader” in All of Us: Using Citizen Science to Understand Bat Populations

“Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinerus), male” by J. N. Stuart is licenses under CC 2.0 Everyone knows DC Comic’s infamous “Caped Crusader” Batman as one of America’s most beloved superheroes. Although he does not possess any supernatural powers like many other … Continue reading

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We Can’t Clam Up Anymore: Giant Clam Conservation Must Be Addressed in French Polynesia

A palette of cool, colorful hues light up the waters of Tatakoto Atoll, part of the Tuamotu island network, in French Polynesia. Until December 2008, the only giant clam to inhabit French Polynesia—Tridacna maxima—was abundant in all of its blue, … Continue reading

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Privacy Please: How Your Morning Commute may be Interrupting Fish Sex

We have all experienced that most irksome of annoyances: unnecessary noise. That car alarm going off at 2am, the not-so-quiet chatter during a test, basically anything your upstairs neighbors do. But for none has background noise been so arduous as … Continue reading

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