Category Archives: Conservation Biology Posts

Lecture on Wolf Conservation

By: Trevor Drees, Ceyda Kural, Kimberly Wood, Kathryn Iverson We made a video lecture on wolf conservation history in the United States, including some of wolf natural history, their role in the ecosystem, threats, as well as past and present … Continue reading

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Coffee and Bees are in Danger!

By Kseniya Anishchenko, Michelle Zhong, Alex Rovner, and Yanghwa Hong Imagine opening up the morning paper, with the top headline: “we must save coffee from extinction.” What would you do? Bees and coffee are related in ways we may not … Continue reading

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Hurricanes, conservation, & climate change

By Matthew Miller, Lani Dufresne, and Siddharth Gorantla Have you ever wondered how hurricanes affect wildlife? Or how climate change is affecting hurricane formation? Then you’re in luck! The following presentation gives answers to these question and more, delving into … Continue reading

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Ice-Solated Polar Bears Fight For Just-Ice

“Polar Bears” by Natalia is licensed under CC BY 2.0” When life gets you down, do you wanna know what you’ve gotta do? Just keep swimming! Whether you may wish to take up Dory’s life advice or not, it is … Continue reading

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Bringing Back the Dead: “Ghost Ponds” and Aquatic Life Conservation

“Frog Pond” by liz wes licensed under CC BY 2.0             Over 75% of small ponds across the United Kingdom have disappeared since the 1900s1. Much of this destruction stems from agricultural consolidation, causing numerous species of local aquatic plants … Continue reading

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In the Dark: North American Bats and Their Plight

“Myotis mytis with White-Nose Syndrome” by Tamás Görföl, via Wikimedia Commons   At first glance, the Ann W. Richards Congress Avenue Bridge in Austin, Texas looks unexceptional, a gray concrete structure. But it doesn’t only transport cars across the lake, … Continue reading

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Meltdown in the Trophics: using glacier runoff to model ecosystems

Melting ice caps are good?! Global warming has a largely negative reputation, yet its most well-known effect, rapid melting of the world’s ice sheets, might be more than just sad polar bears on broken ice. Take for example, Alaska. Its … Continue reading

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