Monthly Archives: October 2016

Turtle Herpes Pandemic

How do turtles get herpes? Nobody knows for sure, but this particular strain of herpesvirus creates cauliflower-like tumors that may end up costing the turtle’s life. Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is a disease that has been observed across all species of sea … Continue reading

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The Walking Extinct

“Mammoth of BC” by Tyler Ingram is licensed under CC 2.0 Harry Potter and Stars Wars aren’t real, but Jurassic Park may soon be. Well, kind of. Dinosaurs aren’t coming back because they’ve been extinct for too long (66 million … Continue reading

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The Fall of The Honey Bee, or the Fall of Humanity?

2007’s Bee movie holds a special place in my heart. It features slapstick comedy, endless bee puns and a romance between a woman and a bee. All things considered, it has no right to be taken seriously by anyone. Yet the way I see … Continue reading

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Preventing the Apocalpyse

Based on modern environmental practices, the apocalyptic desert world of Mad Max: Fury Road may be the future we are heading towards, but recent research has revealed that certain practices may prevent such a disaster and even encourage environmental growth. … Continue reading

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Why the White Rhinoceros is Anything but a White Elephant

White Rhino Eye by Sara Yeomans CC 2.0 If you travel to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya you will have the opportunity to view the last three Northern White Rhinoceroses on the planet. Unable to reproduce, these three aging … Continue reading

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Coastal Development Spells Frightful Demise for Bat Populations

“Myotis macropus” by Michael Pennay is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 Although the coast is an extremely popular place to live, commercial development is causing a ghoulish decline in bat inhabitants.  While coastal areas account for only 4% of the … Continue reading

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Bleaching and Bacteria: (Not) A Microscopic Problem

“Coral bleaching in Chagos” by Mark Spalding/World Research Institute is licensed under CC 2.0               When we hear the phrase “coral reef,” the first thing that comes to mind is a rolling, rainbow expanse … Continue reading

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